Eastgate Pools and Spa

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685 Cincinnati-Batavia Pike Cincinnati, OH 45245
M – F : 10:00 am – 7:00pm | Sat : 10:00am – 6:00pm | Sun : 11:00am – 5:00pm (513) 528-4141

TIPS + HELPFUL INFORMATION ON POOL, SPA + HOT TUB OWNERSHIP

We’re here to make your “Resort living…at home” better with special instruction and insights

Take a moment to read through our Q/A below. It was constructed from the comments and questions of our valued customers to make life easier and make your investment last longer. If you would like to learn more about a specific area of pool, spa and hot tub ownership, let us know through the above link. We’ll add it to our growing database of topics.

Swimming pools

Replacing an above ground swimming pool liner

Overlap Liners Only

The following is intended as a guide to installing a replacement liner in a level-bottom aboveground pool. While there are several other methods that can be attempted, this seems to be the easiest and least-risk method. We also have a couple of pre-job tips. Screws in top-rails and plates may be rusty. Have a can of WD-40 on hand to loosen them up. Also, wasps LOVE to hide under top rails. Cautiously explore and eliminate the wasps with your favorite wasp spray.

  1. Drain your old pool. Remember that once the water is gone, your pool is susceptible to high winds. Don’t pick a day where the weatherman is calling for storms! Also, if your pool is into the ground more than a few inches, stay away from the pool as much as possible so that you do not cave in the dirt and push the wall in.
  2. Without removing any rails, cut the old liner out. There will be a thin strip of liner left at the top of the wall extending over the top of the wall. This will be removed at a later point.
  3. Address the bottom of the pool. Remove any roots, rocks, or sharp objects that could puncture the new liner. Put down new replacement padding if needed (sand or vermiculite). Make sure the cove around the inside of the wall is firm, stable, and in good condition. If it has compressed or washed out over the years, re-build. Most manufacturers recommend a six inch high cove.
  4. Make sure the skimmer and return holes are in good shape. Any areas of rust should be gently sanded and painted with a specialty rust preventative. Make sure the sanded residue does not mix into the ground inside the pool.
  5. Carefully open the new liner box. DO NOT USE A KNIFE OR OTHER SHARP OBJECT!! Also, make sure the liner is the proper size to fit your pool. Eastgate Pools & Spas will not accept the return of a liner if the box has been opened. If possible, unfold the liner in your yard. Make sure there is nothing there that would puncture the liner. If necessary, you may unfold the liner inside the pool. Once unfolded, roll the liner length-ways, and then fold it in half. With help, carefully lift the liner over the wall and place it inside the pool.
  6. Remove shoes, and make sure your toenails and fingernails are well trimmed.
  7. With one other person inside the pool, unroll the liner and position into place. Use the seam that connects the liner’s sidewall and bottom as a guide, keeping the seam equal distance from the wall. There may be a little variation if the pool is slightly out of round, but remember that once you put too much water on the liner, it is not going to move.
  8. Smooth the liner out as much as possible.
  9. Remove any three consecutive sections of top-rail and then the coping and old liner remnants.
  10. Using the old plastic coping or spring-style clothespins, put the liner over the wall a few inches and secure. Do not worry if the sides of the liner are loose. Be careful not to snag the liner on the edges of the top rails.
  11. Skip a few sections and repeat step number 10. Continue until the liner is over the wall throughout the entire pool. Some top rails will still be on the pool and the liner will not be over the wall at these points. This is okay. If you like, you may place a protective layer of duct tape over the edges of the top rails that are still remaining on the pool.
  12. Gently smooth the liner out to minimize wrinkles, and then begin running water SLOWLY.
  13. As the water is added, with your bare feet and hands, gently scoot the liner wrinkles out, working in a straight line from the center to the edges. A little practice will make you an expert. If the water is coming in so fast that the liner becomes difficult to move, shut the water off. Remember that in a 24′ diameter pool, an inch of water weighs more than one ton!
  14. As needed, take excess liner over the wall.
  15. When there is six inches of water in the pool, the liner is ready to be put in its final position on the sidewalls. Gently place your foot at the bottom to hold the liner in place, and then pull any excess liner over the wall. Use the plastic coping to secure the liner into its final position. Continue around the pool, removing rails that are still on the pool. If you have wrinkles in the side, work them out now, as they will be permanent if you do not. In some cases where the pool is not perfectly round, you will not be able to avoid wrinkles in the sidewall. If your pool has a metal stabilizer bar, place this over the coping as you complete positioning of the liner. As you move around the pool, replace top rails on the pool. Complete the entire pool.
  16. When the water level has risen to just below the skimmer and return, you will now bolt on the skimmer and return. Do NOT cut the skimmer liner hole until the skimmer is attached. It is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED that you replace skimmer and return gaskets before placing the skimmer and return back on the pool. Once the entire assembly is attached, VERY CAREFULLY cut the liner out INSIDE the faceplate. Use a very sharp pocketknife or razor knife. As for the return, you may need to cut out the liner BEFORE attaching the return. If so, carefully cut out the liner with a sharp pocketknife or razor knife. Take your time and keep the cut round. If your cut is too big to be covered by the return gasket, the pool will leak.
  17. Continue to fill and check for leaks at the skimmer and return. If necessary, gently tighten the two to eliminate any leaks.

Above ground pool water chemistry

Overlap Liners Only

How many gallons of water does your swimming pool hold? This can be a very easy or a very tough question depending on your point of view. It is without a doubt, though, an extremely important question. It is nearly impossible to add proper dosages of chemicals to your pool if you do not know its capacity. A small above ground may hold around 5,000 gallons while a large one may hold over 20,000 gallons. A proper dosage in one pool will definitely not be a proper dosage in the other. For your convenience, a gallonage chart is given below.

48″ Wall Height 52″ Wall Height 54″ Wall Height

Pool Size Gallons

Pool Size Gallons

Pool Size Gallons

15′ Round 18′ Round

4,978 7,169

15′ Round 18′ Round

5,310 7,646

15′ Round 5,576 18′ Round 8,029

20′ Round 21′ Round 24′ Round

8,850

9,757 12,744

20′ Round 21′ Round 24′ Round

9,440 10,408 13,594

20′ Round 21′ Round 24′ Round

9,912 10,928 14,273

27′ Round 28′ Round 30′ Round 33′ Round

16,129 17,346 19,913 24,094

27′ Round 28′ Round 30′ Round 33′ Round

17,204 18,502 21,240 25,700

27′ Round 28′ Round 30′ Round 33′ Round

18,065 19,428 22,302 26,985

11’x25′ Oval 11’x30′ Oval

6,909 8,291

11’x25′ Oval 11’x30′ Oval

7,370 8,844

11’x25′ Oval 7,739 11’x30′ Oval 9,286

15’x25′ Oval 15’x30′ Oval

9,422 11,306

15’x25′ Oval 15’x30′ Oval

10,050 12,060

15’x25′ Oval 10,553 15’x30′ Oval 12,663

18’x33′ Oval 18’x38′ Oval 18’x40′ Oval

14,924 17,186 18,090

18’x33′ Oval 18’x38′ Oval 18’x40′ Oval

15,919 18,331 19,296

18’x33′ Oval 18’x38′ Oval 18’x40′ Oval

16,715 19,248 20,261

By knowing your pool’s capacity, you will have one half of the information that you need to properly add chemicals to the pool.

Testing Your Pool Water

While your pool’s capacity is extremely important to know, it is also important to know what the chemical levels are in the pool. Proper chemical levels in the pool helps ensure that the water is invitingly clear, clean, and healthy. When the chemical levels in a pool are in their recommended ranges, the water is said to be balanced.

To save time and money, there is no more important thing that you can
do than to test your pool’s water. It is regular water testing that helps ensure
water that is of exceptional quality. Failure to test the pool on a regular basis will almost assuredly result in extra work and expenditures for you. Water testing should be looked at as an investment in fun, and not as work. Without a doubt, most water chemistry problems are directly attributed to the pool owner failing to take a minute or two each day to test their pool’s water. In order to test the pool water, we recommend the use of Pool Water Test Strips. Theseteststrips give better test readings than most of the test kits which use liquid drops. In order to use the test strips properly, please take a couple of minutes to review their instructions.

For your added convenience and ease, Eastgate Pools provides a FREE water testing service, and we encourage you to take advantage of this service. Sample water should be removed from l8” or deeper and placed in a clean plastic or glass bottle. If you are going shopping or are planning on running other errands, make us your first stop. Fresh water will allow for a much more accurate test. Water left in a car for any extended period of time will lose validity, as it will chemically change from your pool’s water.

Chemical Levels

Now that you have learned how to use the test strips to test the pool water, you are probably wondering what it all means. What is the significance of the chlorine, pH, and total alkalinity readings that you have obtained? Well, it’s chemistry time. But please, if your reaction here is to put the book down, don’t. We will keep this as simple as possible.

CHLORINE Far and away the chemical that is most closely associated with swimming pool maintenance is chlorine. Chlorine, in its natural state, is a gas. For home swimming pools, it is common to find chlorine in liquid, granular, and tablet forms.* The job of the chlorine, as you are probably aware, is to disinfect the pool water. Clean pool water is not only free of debris that you can see, but it is also free of bacteria which you cannot see.

Another function of chlorine is to act as an oxidizer. In this capacity, the chlorine breaks down wastes that are brought into the pool by wind, rain, and swimmers. This oxidation process “burns out” small organic debris that are too small to be filtered out.

When chlorine is added to the pool, it forms what is called FREE CHLORINE. Free chlorine is the form of chlorine which can perform the sanitizing and oxidizing functions. As the free chlorine reacts with bacteria and algae, it is depleted. (Sunlight and heat likewise cause the chlorine to deplete from the water.) Also, as the free chlorine reacts with dirt, human waste, fertilizers, etcetera, it forms what is called COMBINED CHLORINE. (Combined chlorine is also called chloramines.) This combined form of chlorine is a much less effective form of sanitizer. As the combined chlorine builds up, swimmers will notice increased eye and skin irritation as well as a strong chlorine odor. While free chlorine is

*Please be aware that chlorine, when used or handled improperly, can be very dangerous in any of its forms. Always read the label of any chemical that you are using, and keep all chemicals out of the reach of children. Store in a well ventilated area away from other chemicals or direct heat. NEVER mix chemicals together.

desirable and needed, combined chlorine is nothing more than a problem causer. The amount of free chlorine plus the amount of combined chlorine equals what is called TOTAL CHLORINE.

Total Chlorine = Free Chlorine + Combined Chlorine

Because chlorine can be either free or combined, it is important to know what form your test kit is testing. If your test kit uses a solution labeled Orthotolidine, or OTO for short, it is testing the total chlorine level in the pool. This reading may or may not be useful, depending on how much combined chlorine is in the water. (Remember, free chlorine is useful, but combined is not useful. The problem with a total chlorine reading is that it doesn’t decipher between combined and free.) More useful to the pool owner is either test strips which check for free chlorine or a test kit which uses a reagent called DPD on the chlorine test. DPD kits can give both free chlorine and total chlorine levels. When a test strip or kit tests for free chlorine, the pool owner gets a much more accurate indicator of the “health” of their pool. (For complete testing information, refer to your test kit or test strips.)

Now that you have a better understanding of chlorine and the forms that it can take, how do you maintain proper chlorine levels in your pool, and what are the proper chlorine levels? The recommended chlorine levels are as such:

When chlorine levels are not kept in the recommended ranges, the following problems can occur:

page3image1475080944

Free Chlorine – 1.0 to 3.0 Parts Per Million Combined Chlorine – Under 0.3 Parts Per Million

page3image1475089088

Chlorine Level

Problem

Free Chlorine Too Low

•Inadequate disinfection

Free Chlorine Too High

•Chlorine is wasted, hence wasted money

Combined Chlorine •Irritation to swimmers’ eyes and skin Too High •Strong smell of chlorine

•Bacteria and algae can thrive

In order to raise the free chlorine level in any pool, you simply add chlorine to the water. The hard part here is really more a matter of deciding what chlorine product to use. Eastgate Pools recommends SPARCO Slow Dissolving Tablets for daily chlorination. The reason for this recommendation is that slow dissolving tablets need to be added less frequently than fast dissolving tablets, granular chlorine, or liquid chlorine. Large slow dissolving tablets may need to be added only a couple of times per week, while other

products may need to be added on a daily basis. Since pool sizes, weather, and usage all affect chlorine usage, it is impossible to say how many tablets you will need weekly. The safest way to know when and how much chlorine to add is by testing on a regular basis and then adding chlorine based on the test readings, your pool’s size, and the label’s instructions. A simple test holds the key to your pool’s water quality, and there is no substitute for it.

Now that we’ve examined free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorinating your pool on a regular basis, we can look at what to do when the combined chlorine level builds up in the pool. Remember, combined chlorine levels over 0.3 PPM are undesirable. Over time, this level will build up despite how well you keep up on adding chlorine to the pool. In order to bring the combined chlorine level down, you must add a larger than normal dose of chlorine. This dose of chlorine is called shocking, or super chlorinating the pool, and it is 3 to 5 times the normal dose of chlorine. A weekly shock treatment will destroy chloramines, human waste, algae and bacteria.

To shock your pool, Eastgate Pools recommends using one bag (1 lb) of Power Magic Super Oxidizer per 10,000 gallons of pool water.

Pounds of Power Magic = Gallons Pool Water / 10,000

For example, on a 24’, 54” pool, shock with 1.5 lb of Power Magic. 1.5 pounds = 14,273/10,000 (rounded)

Shock treatment is recommended at least once per week, but in extremely hot weather with a lot of use, or in rainy weather, more frequent shock treatments may be needed. If at anytime the chlorine level drops to zero, shock the pool immediately, as the chlorine level may actually be below zero. (This is referred to as chlorine demand.) When the weather is hot, a chlorine level of zero can result in a cloudy or green pool within 24 hours. If your pool ever gets a bad algae problem, you may be instructed to use a heavier and more frequent dosage of shock. After shocking the pool, please allow enough time for the chlorine level to drop back down to its normal level before allowing swimmers to use the pool. If the pool needs to be shocked and used immediately, we recommend that you use a non-chlorine shock treatment product called SPARCO Quick Acting Super Shock. (An Eastgate representative can give you all of the details on this product.)

  1. AddSLAMDichlorShock.Pre-dissolveSLAMinabucketofwarmwaterandpourintothe pool. One pound treats 10,000 gallons.
  2. WaitfourhoursandinstalltheMineralReservoirinthecycler.Adjustthesettingto‘Maximum’. RUN FOR TEN MINUTES.
  3. Removethelidusingtheblacklidremovaltoolthathasbeenincluded.Unscrewthelidon BAM and insert BAM into the Mineral Reservoir. Press it into place inside the Reservoir. This will break the seal and allow the liquid to flow through the system when it is turned back on. If a little spills into the cycler or Reservoir it will not hurt anything. Turn you motor on and let it run.
  4. Testyourpoolwaterdailyuntilthechlorinelevelhasdroppedto1.0ppm.Atthistime,shutthe system down and add a Bac Pac to the cycler. Simply remove the empty BAM container and replace it with the Bac Pac. The life of a Bac Pac varies based on a number of variables, such as pool size, weather, and water balance. We recommend you check your Bac Pac fairly frequently until you become acquainted with the system. WHEN ADDING THE BAC PAC, TURN YOUR CYCLER SETTING DOWN—do not run it at ‘maximum’! The normal setting is from 3-7 but you may find your’s can be set even lower. If you are getting too much chlorine into the water reduce your setting 1⁄2 point on the dial (such as from 4 to 3.5 or from 3 to 2.5). Adjustments should always be made in 1⁄2 point increments until you find your desired level. Please see the following chart to adjust your level to the correct setting.
  5. Oneweeklater,addPowerPackatarateof1lb./10,000gallons.Addagainevery10-14days to deep your pool sparkling and clear.

SLAM is designed to be added once per season, at start-up. In instances where you have a party with lots of swimmers, you may want to add SLAM or Liquid Pool Shock immediately after the party ends. You may also need to add this supplemental shock to your pool after a heavy rain. Rainwater is acidic, which in turn escalates the oxidation process. You may need that sudden influx of chlorine to clear cloudy water or prevent algae growth.

IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT YOU ADD A SECOND BOTTLE OF BAM TO YOUR POOL AT THE MID-POINT OF THE SWIM SEASON.

At the end of the season, throw away the mineral chamber and winterize the system per Eastgate Pools & Spas recommendations.

page6image1474032688 page6image1474033008

Pool Size Gallons

12 Hour Pump Run Time Pump Size

1 11/2 2

24 Hour Pump Run Time Pump Size

1 11/2 2

7,000

2.5

4

3.5

3.5

3

2.5

9,000

3

2.5

4

4

3.5

3

12,000

3.5

3

2.5

2.5

1.5

3.5

18,000

4

3.5

3

3

2.5

2

25,000

5

4

3.5

3.5

3

2.5

Power Ionizer Hybrid Salt System

Keeping your pool clean, clear, and free of bacteria and algae is easy with the Power Ionizer Hybrid Salt System. This represents state-of-the-art technology that uses a synergistic approach to keeping pool water clean and algae free. Different components work together to give you the most foolproof system on the market. It is composed of:

*Sodium tetraborates. Algae thrive when Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is present in pool water. Borates remove CO2, effectively choking algae before it can thrive.

*Copper ions. The base unit puts copper into your pool’s water. Copper is an effective tool in combating algae growth.

*Blended shock. Most shocks contain one working item only. Refresh blended shock contains sodium dichor AND potassium monopersulfate. Sodium dichlor works with the rest of the system to kill bacteria and combat algae growth. Potassium monopersulfate is a natural mineral oxidizer, effective at ‘burning out’ organic particles.

*Natural enzymes. Cleanse is a liquid added every two weeks. All natural, it serves as an aid to potassium monopersulfate in keeping pool water sparkling clean.

*Salt. From deep in the earth, salt serves a couple of purposes. It helps make the water feel soft and inviting to swimmers. It facilitates an increase of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS). Proper TDS levels increase the efficiency of the ionization process.

To summarize, The Power Ionizer Hybrid Salt System WORKS! Your pool will never look or feel better.

Power Ionizer Start Up Procedure

  1. Inthefirstyear,addtwo40-poundbagsofAquaSaltpoolsalttoyourpool.Infuture years, add one bag on pools smaller than 28′. Use 2 bags on 28’ and larger pools. If needed, use your vacuum pole and brush to stir it up.
  2. Add 2-4 pounds of Stabilizer to your pool if this is a new system or if you have new water in the pool. If this is an existing system, have Eastgate Pools & Spas test your water and add enough to get to a minimum of 30 ppm.
  3. Add the entire bucket of Condition to your pool. You may slowly add it thru the skim- mer or you may simply walk around the pool and pour it in. Again, use the vacuum pole and brush to stir it up. Condition contains sodium tetraborates that combat algae growth. It also contains cyanuric acid (stabilizer) and mineral removers that isolate some unwanted minerals.
  4. Start the system and turn the control knob all the way to the highest setting. Allow this to run continuously for 2-3 days. At this point, test your pool for copper with the Power Ionizer Test Strips. The optimal level is .3-.5 parts per million (ppm). Adjust accordingly until you are in the proper range.
  5. Every two weeks add Refresh bagged shock. One bag treats 10,000 gallons of water. Consult the chart located at the front of this manual to determine how many gallons your pool has or give your pool experts at Eastgate Pools a call at 513-528-4141. We’ll be glad to help. For example, a 24’ round pool would require approximately 11⁄2 bags of Refresh every other week. An 18’ pool would require only 3⁄4 of a bag every two weeks.
  6. Every two weeks, add one bottle of Cleanse to your pool. This is a natural enzyme that will help keep the pool sparkling and clear. It virtually ‘eats’ oils! Also, test the water for proper copper level, as well as pH, alkalinity, and calcium. Adjust as needed. You may wish to test more often, especially in cases where we have had a major storm or lots of rain.
  7. NOTE: As the swim season turns into late summer it may be necessary to turn the unit up a little to put more copper in the water. Again, maintain .3-.5 ppm.
  8. Sitback,relax,swimandkeeptothisscheduleforaclean,clear,hassle-freesummer in you pool.

The Power Ionizer cell will usually last one full season. Extremely large pools may require a second cell late in the season. Only need it for a month? Not a problem as it will still be good the next year.

Naturally, it is important that you maintain proper pool water chemistry throughout the sea- son. (pH, alkalinity, calcium, etc.) Your friends at Eastgate Pools are happy to perform free water tests for you anytime you stop in at the store.

When it is time to close up the pool for the season (boo!) simply winterize with Chill. This is a specially formulated winterizing product produced exclusively for the
Power Ionizer System. It will contain all the chemicals you need to put the pool to bed for the winter. Remove the base unit and store inside. Questions? Give us a call.

pH pH is not as familiar to most people as chlorine is, but it is just as important. pH is a measure of whether something is acidic, basic, or neutral, and it is always measured on a scale of 0 to 14. Everything has a pH value associated with it. A pH of 7.0 is neutral, a pH under 7.0 is acidic, and a pH over 7.0 is basic.

pH Scale
Acid Neutral Basic

0 7 14

pH is important to swimming pool water for many reasons, and as such, it cannot be neglected without problems occurring. On a swimming pool, the pH should be kept in the following range:

Recommended pH Range – 7.2 to 7.6

If the pH is not kept in the proper range, the pool owner may experience the following problems:

page9image1501627840 page9image1501628176page9image1501628432

pH Level

Problem

pH Too Low

•Corrodes surfaces and equipment •Wrinkles and fades vinyl liners •Increases chlorine consumption •Irritates swimmers’ skin and eyes

pH Too High

•Scales pool surfaces and equipment •Contributes to cloudy water
•Drops efficiency of chlorine •Irritates swimmers’ skin and eyes

Of the problems associated with an improper pH, the one that should be of the most interest to the pool owner is the drop in the efficiency of chlorine at a high pH. It is not uncommon when we perform water tests to find pools’ with a pH of 8.0 or above. Unfortunately, at this pH level, the chlorine level must be kept 2 to 3 times higher in order to achieve the same sanitizing level as is achieved at a pH of 7.2 to 7.6. The result is that the pool owner either wastes money by having to keep the chlorine level at an elevated level or their pool water turns cloudy or green. Neither scenario is necessary or desirable.

The pool’s pH is crucial, and luckily, fairly easy to test for and adjust. All swimming pool test kits should test for pH, and by now you’ve probably become familiar with how to use your test kit or strips. Once you have tested the water and obtained your results, you can make any needed adjustments to the pH.

If the pH tests low, you will use SPARCO pH Plus. To determine how much pH Plus to add, you will need to know your pH test results and your pool’s capacity. The label on the container of pH Plus will then instruct you on how much product to add.

If the pH tests high, you will need to add SPARCO pH Minus or Muriatic Acid. SPARCO pH Minus is a granular product where as Muriatic Acid is a liquid product. (For safety reasons, pH minus is normally the preferred product to use.) To determine how much pH Minus to add, carry out the same procedure as described for a low pH. When adding pH Minus or acid, never add it through the skimmer, and choose an area away from metal ladders or other metal components. For you and your family’s safety, always wear protective goggles and gloves when handling muriatic acid. Wash any spills off of clothing or pool decking and equipment immediately. Store well out of reach of children in a well ventilated area, away from other chemicals or heat

TOTAL ALKALINITY No discussion of pH would be complete without looking at total alkalinity. Total alkalinity is a measure of alkaline materials in the pool water. While this doesn’t mean much to most of us, what is important is that these alkaline materials play a significant role in helping to maintain the pool’s pH. These alkaline materials help prevent changes in the pool’s pH. At proper total alkalinity levels, the pool’s pH will be more stable. This stabilizing is referred to as buffering the pH.

On vinyl lined swimming pools, the total alkalinity should be kept at the following levels:

Total Alkalinity – 80 to 150 Parts Per Million

In the event that the total alkalinity is out of range, the following problems may occur:

page10image1501896624 page10image1501896944

Alkalinity Level

Problem

Total Alkalinity Too Low

•pH is difficult to maintain – It drifts •Corrodes surfaces and equipment •Stains pool surfaces

Total Alkalinity Too High

•pH is difficult to adjust – It remains fixed •Scales pool equipment and surfaces
•Makes water cloudy
•Since pH stays high, sanitizer efficiency drops

Depending on your test kit, you may or may not be able to test for total alkalinity at home. If you can’t test total alkalinity at home, bring us a water sample three or four times during the season and we’ll test it for you.

Pools with low total alkalinity levels need SPARCO Alkalinity Plus added to them. This product is a powder and is very easy to add. When dosing a pool with SPARCO Alkalinity Plus, never add more than three to four pounds at a time. Wait at least three hours before adding a second dose. Continue in such a manner until the appropriate poundage has been added. For the proper dosages, see the container’s label or use the chart below.

TO RAISE TOTAL ALKALINITY WITH SPARCO ALKALINITY PLUS

GALLONS OF

WATER

DESIRED INCREASE IN PARTS PER MILLION(ppm)

10 ppm

20 ppm

30 ppm

40 ppm

50 ppm

60 ppm

70 ppm

80 ppm

90 ppm

100 ppm

1000

2.40 oz.

4.80 oz.

7.20 oz.

9.60 oz.

12.0 oz.

14.4 oz.

1.05 lbs.

1.20 lbs.

1.35 lbs.

1.50 lbs.

5000

12.0 oz.

1.50 lbs.

2.25 lbs.

3.00 lbs.

3.75 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

5.25 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

6.75 lbs.

7.50 lbs.

10000

1.50 lbs.

3.00 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

7.50 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

10.5 lbs.

12.0 lbs.

13.5 lbs.

15.0 lbs.

15000

2.25 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

6.75 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

11.25 lbs.

13.5 lbs.

15.75 lbs.

18.0 lbs.

20.25 lbs.

22.5 lbs.

20000

3.00 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

12.0 lbs.

15.0 lbs.

18.0 lbs.

21.0 lbs.

24.0 lbs.

27.0 lbs.

30.0 lbs.

High total alkalinity pools require SPARCO pH Minus. You will need to use the dosage as recommended on the container or use the chart on the next page.

TO LOWER TOTAL ALKALINITY WITH SPARCO pH MINUS

GALLONS OF

WATER

DESIRED DECREASE IN PARTS PER MILLION(ppm)

10 ppm

20 ppm

30 ppm

40 ppm

50 ppm

60 ppm

70 ppm

80 ppm

90 ppm

100 ppm

1000

2.40 oz.

4.80 oz.

7.20 oz.

9.60 oz.

12.0 oz.

14.4 oz.

1.05 lbs.

1.20 lbs.

1.35 lbs.

1.50 lbs.

5000

12.0 oz.

1.50 lbs.

2.25 lbs.

3.00 lbs.

3.75 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

5.25 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

6.75 lbs.

7.50 lbs.

10000

1.50 lbs.

3.00 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

7.50 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

10.5 lbs.

12.0 lbs.

13.5 lbs.

15.0 lbs.

15000

2.25 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

6.75 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

11.25 lbs.

13.5 lbs.

15.75 lbs.

18.0 lbs.

20.25 lbs.

22.5 lbs.

20000

3.00 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

12.0 lbs.

15.0 lbs.

18.0 lbs.

21.0 lbs.

24.0 lbs.

27.0 lbs.

30.0 lbs.

In the event that the pH and total alkalinity both need adjusted, always adjust the total alkalinity first, since this acts as a buffer for the pH.

CALCIUMHARDNESS Calciumhardnessisameasureofdissolvedcalciuminthepool’swater. For the most part, calcium hardness is not an item that the pool owner needs to monitor continuously. Having Eastgate check the water several times a year is sufficient in most cases. The reason for not needing to have this tested as often is because it does not change near as quickly as the chlorine, pH, and total alkalinity do.

Contrary to popular belief, soft water is not good for swimming pools or spas. Soft water is virtually impossible to keep balanced and will lead to heavy corrosion on skimmer screws, metal ladder components, and metal filter and pump parts. Calcium levels will be affected by heavy rainfall and the topping off of the pool by soft water. Again, your Eastgate Pool Professional can guide you through the testing and can make necessary recommendations.

The calcium hardness should be kept in the following range:

Calcium Hardness – 120 to 300 Parts Per Million

If the calcium hardness is out of range, the pool owner may see the following problems:

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Hardness Level

Problem

Calcium Hardness Too Low

•Corrodes pool equipment

Calcium Hardness Too High

•Makes water cloudy
•Scaling may form on equipment and surfaces

Since calcium hardness will usually be tested at our store, any recommended action , if needed, will be prescribed when we test the water.

Specialized Chemistry Considerations

Even the best cared for and “balanced” pool will need a few other chemical additions to its water to keep things looking clean and clear. The swimming pool industry refers to these other chemicals as “specialty chemicals.” These specialty chemicals help reduce overall chemical usage as well as maintenance time.

CYANURIC ACID Of all the specialty chemicals, cyanuric acid is among the most important. Cyanuric acid is important to the pool owner because its use can help reduce the use of chlorine. Cyanuric acid, which is also called stabilizer or conditioner, helps to reduce the rate at which the sun depletes the free chlorine in the water. By slowing the depletion rate, less chlorine will be used. Since chlorine is the biggest chemical expense that a pool will have, it makes sense to make sure your pool is stabilized. The cost of stabilizer will be made up for in chlorine savings.

Many forms of chlorine have stabilizer built into them, requiring the pool owner to only have to establish the initial cyanuric acid level. Once this level is established, a stabilized chlorine will be able to maintain this level unless significant amounts of new water are added. The recommended cyanuric acid level is as such:

Cyanuric Acid – 30 to 125 Parts Per Million

The result of too low or too high of a stabilizer reading are:

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Cyanuric Level

Problem

Cyanuric Acid Too Low

•Increased chlorine consumption

Cyanuric Acid

Too High

•Chlorine becomes locked

Historically, we do not see many cases where the stabilizer level is high enough to cause the chlorine not to work, but it can happen if not enough fresh water is added to a pool over time. On a new pool, especially, this chlorine lock is not something to worry about.

For the most part, test kits designed for home use do not test cyanuric acid. Cyanuric acid is easily tested for on our professional equipment, and we will be happy to test your pool’s water anytime that you have questions or concerns. After we have the test results, we will advise you whether or not SPARCO Chlorine Conditioner & Stabilizer needs to be added.

Cyanuric Acid often carries over well from one season to the next, so before arbitrarily adding cyanuric acid to your pool next year, have your water professionally tested at Eastgate Pools. You may not need to add stabilizer or conditioner!

ALGAECIDE Whenyoulookatpoolproblems,themostcommononeiswithoutadoubt,algae.There are several reasons for this problem being so widespread. The first reason is improper maintenance. Inadequate chlorine levels, improper water balance, and improper filtration can all play a part in the growth of algae. Because algae can develop in such a short time, the importance of regular testing cannot be stressed enough. A couple of minutes can save you countless hours and dollars. But more importantly, the small time investment keeps your pool fun, which is probably why you purchased it in the first place.

The second reason why algae is such a common problem on swimming pools is that algae is a very tough and resourceful plant. Algae is a primitive plant, so it is definitely not a new problem. While proper chlorine and pH levels will go a long way towards preventing algae growth, there will be times that for one reason or another, the water chemistry is not exactly where it needs to be. It is for this reason that SPARCO Algae Destroyer should be used on a regular basis. Algae Destroyer is a broad spectrum algaecide which not only kills algae, but also helps to prevent its emergence. The use of Algae Destroyer gives the pool owner another line of defense against the most common pool problem. On a weekly basis, you should add 4.3 to 8.6 ounces of Algae Destroyer per 10,000 gallons of water. For convenience, we recommend adding Algae Destroyer each week when you shock your pool.

If your pool does get algae, the first thing that you will need to do is to check and to adjust the water balance. The pool should then be shocked and a dose of Algae Destroyer added. (See dosage rate on Algae Destroyer for a pool with visible algae growth.) It is important that these treatments begin as soon as possible due to the speed with which algae can grow. Also, algae is easier to kill when it is immature. The longer algae is left untreated, the more of it you will have, and the harder it will be to kill. During treatment for algae, the filter should be run continuously until the problem is remedied. (See Filtration & Vacuuming sections of this manual for more tips on dealing with an algae problem.)

METAL REMOVERS Depending on the source water for the pool, metals may be present in the water. Testing for these metals will be done by your pool dealer, as few home test kits will test for them. (The most common metals tested for are copper and iron.) If metals are found in your water, an Eastgate employee will instruct you on how to handle them. If these metals are not removed or made “inactive”, they can potentially cause staining.

IMPORTANT NOTE: If your pool’s water turns colored the first time chlorine is added, it is probably due to metals in the water. The chlorine oxidizes the metals which leads to the discoloration. To remedy this problem, bring a water sample to Eastgate Pools and we will analyze the water and make recommenda- tions on what steps will need to be taken. Fortunately, this is a very uncommon problem.

WATER CLARIFIERS While algae is the number one pool water problem, cloudy water is not far behind. In fact, in most cases of heavy algae growth in a pool, the pool will go through a cloudy phase either before green is visible or after the green is gone. (Note, cloudy water can have causes other that algae, but proportionately, algae is the number one cause of cloudy water.)

In the early stages of algae growth, it is quite common for the pool walls and bottom to get “slimy” while the actual water begins to turn cloudy. If not shocked and balanced quickly, the pool water will quickly progress to green. If at anytime you see cloudy water developing, immediately check the pool’s chemical

levels. In most cases, the chlorine level will be very low. The quicker the pool is shocked and balanced, the better the likelihood that a major algae problem can be avoided.

Cloudy water is also a very common problem after a pool has had a major algae problem. The reason for this cloudiness is that after the pool has been shocked and treated with algaecide, the algae may be killed, but it just won’t disappear. The dead algae remains in the pool water leaving a milky, or cloudy appearance. These dead algae cells are very difficult to filter out due to their extremely small size. When you are fighting a major algae problem, you should expect to see the water go from dark green to light green to cloudy. As you see these changes taking place, you will know that the algae is being killed.

As was mentioned, dead algae is very difficult to filter out. In order to help the filter, clarifiers are used. Clarifiers work by taking small particles and helping to clump them together so that they are easier to filter. Clarifiers come in varying strengths, and for extremely cloudy pools we recommend SPARCO Crystal Clear. In some cases, a clarifier will not be strong enough to do the job, and in these cases SPARCO Super Floc should be used.

In the event that your pool has a clarity problem, Eastgate Pools will be happy to test your pool’s water and make recommendations on the proper steps to take to remedy the problem. Our hope is that with this manual and with our personalized help, we can help you maintain your pool so that you never need to worry about cloudy water problems.

CHEMICAL SUMMARY Theprecedingsectionhasgivenafairlydetailedoverviewofswim- ming pool chemistry, and it may have you wondering just what you’ve gotten yourself into by purchasing a pool. Fear not! If you test the pool on a regular basis, paying close attention to the water’s chlorine and pH levels, pool problems will be minimized. The vast majority of pool water problems are created when the chlorine level is allowed to drop below its acceptable level. When you add in improper pH levels, problems soon develop. A couple minutes investment on your part to test the water will pay huge dividends in time, fun, and money. The other chemical levels and chemical additions are important, but the chlorine and pH levels are absolutely crucial.

Test

Range

Free Chlorine

1.0 – 3.0 ppm

Combined Chlorine

< 0.3 ppm

pH

7.2 – 7.6

Total Alkalinity

80 – 150 ppm

Calcium Hardness

120 – 300 ppm

Cyanuric Acid

30 – 125ppm

Metals

0 ppm

Water Test Summary

THE BAQUACIL ALTERNATIVE Some of our customers will elect to use a non-chlorine alternative for pool sanitization. For them, Baquacil is a superb alternative. Baquacil is the chlorine-free option that is very popular because sunlight and heat have virtually no effect on the sanitizer levels. Baquacil is not compatible with chlorine. If you are wishing to start your new pool using Baquacil, the Baquacil Easy Start Kit will provide you with everything needed to get rolling. If you have already chlorinated your pool and wish to convert to Baquacil, please ask your Eastgate Pools Water Profes- sional for advice and he or she will be glad to guide you through the complete process.

When bringing in a water sample for testing, please advise the test person that you are using Baquacil.

In ground pool water chemistry

Overlap Liners Only

Your Swimming Pools Capacity

How many gallons of water does your swimming pool hold? This can be a very easy or a very tough question depending on your point of view. It is without a doubt, though, an extremely important question. It is nearly impossible to add proper dosages of chemicals to your pool if you do not know its capacity. A small inground pool may hold around 7,500 gallons of water while a large one may hold more than 40,000 gallons. A proper dosage in one pool will definitely not be a proper dosage in the other. For your convenience, a gallonage chart for Imperial Pools is given below.

GALLONAGE CHART

Pool Size Gallons Pool Size Gallons Pool Size Gallons

400 Patio

21×21 26×26

11,070 14,910

1000 4′ Radius

16×32 18×36 20×40 18 x 43 L

19,046 23,500 30,557 26,123

4100 Keyhole

16×32 18×36 20×40

11,200 15,150 21,600

500 Jewel

16×28 16×32 16×36 18×38 18×42

11,716 16,566 18,108 21,239 21,550

2000 2′ Radius

12×24 16×32 16×36 18×36
18 x 43 L 18x26x37L 20×40

8,840 19,365 20,961 23,803 26,439 26,624 30,875

5100 Lagoon

16x34x25 18x37x29 20x42x31

14,800 22,100 26,850

550 Oval

16×32 18×36 20×40

17,540 21,420 27,860

600 Kidney

16×30 18×36 20×38

14,900 20,145 20,883

2100 Roman

16×35 16×37 18×39 18×41 20×41 20×43 18 x 44 L

19,817 19,883 24,623 24,689 28,987 29,053 25,520

700 Grecian

17×33 17×37 20×36 20×40 17 x 39 L 20 x 44 L

19,538 21,213 23,623 26,670 22,594 28,780

3000 Mt Lake

20×32 20×37 21×40 24×44

13,300 17,400 19,600 24,400

NOTE: Pools with 8′ walk in stairs add 360 gallons. Pools with 12′ radius walk in stairs add 520 gallons.

By knowing your pool’s capacity, you will have one half of the information that you need to properly add chemicals to the pool.

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Testing Your Pool Water

While your pool’s capacity is extremely important to know, it is also important to know what the chemical levels are in the pool. Proper chemical levels in the pool helps ensure that the water is invitingly clear, clean, and healthy. When the chemical levels in a pool are in their recommended ranges, the water is said to be balanced.

To save time and money, there is no more important thing that you
can do than to test your pool’s water. It is regular water testing that helps
ensure water that is of exceptional quality. Failure to test the pool on a regular
basis will almost assuredly result in extra work and expenditures for you.
Water testing should be looked at as an investment in fun, and not as work.
Without a doubt, most water chemistry problems are directly attributed to the pool owner failing to take a minute or two each day to test their pool’s water. In order to test the pool water, we recommend the use ofPoolWaterTestStrips. Theseteststripsgivebettertestreadingsthanmostofthetestkitswhichuse liquid drops. In order to use the test strips properly, please take a couple of minutes to review their instructions.

Chemical Levels

Now that you have learned how to use the test strips to test the pool water, you are probably wondering what it all means. What is the significance of the chlorine, pH, and total alkalinity readings that you have obtained? Well, it’s chemistry time. But please, if your reaction here is to put the book down, don’t. We will keep this as simple as possible.

At this time, let’s look at the items that make your pool water clean and balanced. We will look at them one at a time and will also look at their relationship to other chemicals. (Note, pools using Baquacil should refer to their user’s guide for complete instructions and information on this alternative sanitization systems.)

CHLORINE Far and away the chemical that is most closely associated with swimming pool maintenance is chlorine. Chlorine, in its natural state, is a gas. For home swimming pools, it is common to find chlorine in liquid, granular, and tablet forms.* The job of the chlorine, as you are probably aware, is to disinfect the pool water. Clean pool water is not only free of debris that you can see, but it is also free of bacteria which you cannot see.

*Please be aware that chlorine, when used or handled improperly, can be very dangerous in any of its forms. Always read the label of any chemical that you are using, and keep all chemicals out of the reach of children. Store in a well ventilated area away from other chemicals or direct heat. NEVER mix chemicals together.

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Another function of chlorine is to act as an oxidizer. In this capacity, the chlorine breaks down wastes that are brought into the pool by wind, rain, and swimmers. This oxidation process “burns out” small organic debris that are too small to be filtered out.

When chlorine is added to the pool, it forms what is called FREE CHLORINE. Free chlorine is the form of chlorine which can perform the sanitizing and oxidizing functions. As the free chlorine reacts with bacteria and algae, it is depleted. (Sunlight and heat likewise cause the chlorine to deplete from the water.) Also, as the free chlorine reacts with dirt, human waste, fertilizers, and other materials, it forms what is called COMBINED CHLORINE. (Combined chlorine is also called chloramines.) This combined form of chlorine is a much less effective form of sanitizer. As the combined chlorine builds up, swimmers will notice increased eye and skin irritation as well as a strong chlorine odor. While free chlorine is desirable and needed, combined chlorine is nothing more than a problem causer. The amount of free chlorine plus the amount of combined chlorine equals what is called TOTAL CHLORINE.

page3image1506072240 page3image1506072560

Total Chlorine = Free Chlorine + Combined Chlorine

Because chlorine can be either free or combined, it is important to know what form your test kit is testing. If your test kit uses a solution labeled Orthotolidine, or OTO for short, it is testing the total chlorine level in the pool. This reading may or may not be useful, depending on how much combined chlorine is in the water. (Remember, free chlorine is useful, but combined is not useful. The problem with a total chlorine reading is that it doesn’t decipher between combined and free.) More useful to the pool owner is either test strips which check for free chlorine or a test kit which uses a reagent called DPD on the chlorine test. DPD kits can give both free chlorine and total chlorine levels. When a test strip or kit tests for free chlorine, the pool owner gets a much more accurate indicator of the “health” of their pool. (For complete testing information, refer to your test kit or test strips.)

Now that you have a better understanding of chlorine and the forms that it can take, how do you maintain proper chlorine levels in your pool, and what are the proper chlorine levels? The recommended chlorine levels are as such:

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Free Chlorine – 1.0 to 3.0 Parts Per Million Combined Chlorine – Under 0.3 Parts Per Million

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When chlorine levels are not kept in the recommended ranges, the following problems can occur:

Chlorine Level

Problem

Free Chlorine Too Low

•Inadequate disinfection

Free Chlorine Too High

•Chlorine is wasted, hence wasted money

Combined Chlorine •Irritation to swimmers’ eyes and skin Too High •Strong smell of chlorine

•Bacteria and algae can thrive

In order to raise the free chlorine level in any pool, you simply add chlorine to the water. The hard part here is really more a matter of deciding what chlorine product to use. Eastgate Pools recommends SPARCO Slow Dissolving Tablets for daily chlorination. The reason for this recommendation is that slow dissolving tablets need to be added less frequently than fast dissolving tablets, granular chlorine, or liquid chlorine. Large slow dissolving tablets may need to be added only a couple of times per week, while other products may need to be added on a daily basis. Since pool sizes, weather, and usage all affect chlorine usage, it is impossible to say how many tablets you will need weekly. The safest way to know when and how much chlorine to add is by testing on a regular basis and then adding chlorine based on the test readings, your pool’s size, and the label’s instructions. A simple test holds the key to your pool’s water quality, and there is no substitute for it.

An even better way to chlorinate your pool is to use a SPARCO Automatic Water Treatment System. Even if you didn’t get the Cycler with your pool package, you can add one if desired. The SPARCO Automatic Water Treatment System is desirable because you do not have to handle chlorine, making things safer and less time consuming. Because this system can hold a large amount of chlorine tablets, you may only need to replace the treatment chamber every three to five weeks. (Actual time may vary due to pool size, weather conditions, usage levels, and other factors.) Since the chlorinator is dispensing chlorine over a long period, the pool owner is better protected against drops in the chlorine level that lead to algae and cloudy water.

Another advantage of the SPARCO Automatic Water Treatment System is that it can save money. Money is saved because as the weather changes, you adjust how much chlorine is dispensed into the pool. With most other chlorine products, you cannot control their dispersal into the pool. Over the course of the season you will save time and money as well as reduce the chances of water problems by using this system. (For more information , please contact an Eastgate representative. If your pool is equipped with a SPARCO System, please read the owner’s manual that came with it.)

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5

The Mineral Reserve System is an advanced system that utilizes the SPARCO Automatic Water Treatment chamber and allows you, the pool owner, to operated with a greatly reduced amount of chlorine—approximately 1⁄4 to 1⁄2 the normal amount. It consists of two separate components that fit inside. The first is the Mineral Reservoir, which contains silver (for killing bacteria), zinc (combating algae), and calcium carbonate (for pH stabilization). The Mineral Reservoir will last for the entire pool season, and is easily activated. Just place it in the chamber and water activates it. Inside the Mineral Reservoir is a Bac Pac. This is simply a slow, low feed of chlorine. The Bac Pac will usually last for 2-3 weeks before needing to be replaced.

The Mineral Reserve System minimizes red eyes, swimsuit bleaching, and fading of your liner and increases the overall quality of your pool’s water. Whenever you bring in a water sample for testing, please let your test person know that you are using the Mineral Reserve System.

Now that we’ve examined free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorinating your pool on a regular basis, we can look at what to do when the combined chlorine level builds up in the pool. Remember, combined chlorine levels over 0.3 PPM are undesirable. Over time, this level will build up despite how well you keep up on adding chlorine to the pool. In order to bring the combined chlorine level down, you must add a larger than normal dose of chlorine. This dose of chlorine is called shocking, or super chlorinating the pool, and it is 3 to 5 times the normal dose of chlorine. A weekly shock treatment will destroy chloramines, human waste, algae and bacteria.

To shock your pool, Eastgate Pools recommends using one bag (1 lb) of Power Magic Super Oxidizer per 10,000gallons of pool water. Power Magic is superior to liquid chlorine in that it contains sodium tetraborate. Borates are effective at removing CO2 from your pool’s water. Algae thrive on CO2 and when these levels are reduced, algae cannot survive. Liquid shock does not contain borates and is thus, far less effective at combating algae.

Pounds of Power Magic = Gallons Pool Water / 10,000

For example, on an 18 x 36 2000 pool with walk-in stairs, shock with 2.5 lb of Power Magic.

2.5 pounds = 24,480/10,000 (rounded)

Shock treatment is recommended at least once per week, but in extremely hot weather with a lot of use, or in rainy weather, more frequent shock treatments may be needed. If at anytime the chlorine level drops to zero, shock the pool immediately, as the chlorine level may actually be below zero. (This is referred to as chlorine demand.) When the weather is hot, a chlorine level of zero can result in a cloudy or green pool within 24 hours. If your pool ever gets a bad algae problem, you may be instructed to use a heavier and more frequent dosage of shock. After shocking the pool, please allow enough time for the chlorine level to drop back down to its normal level before allowing swimmers to use the pool. If the pool needs to be shocked and used immediately, we recommend that you use a non-chlorine shock treatment product called SPARCO Quick Acting Super Shock. (An Eastgate representative can give you all of the details on this product.)

6

If you selected a chlorine generator, you have chosen our most convenient and advanced system. A chlorine generating system actually converts ordinary salt (sodium chloride) into chlorine, thus effectively destroying algae and bacteria. Once done, it converts back into salt, whereby the cycle continues again. You will still need to add liquid chlorine (shock) to your pool to eliminate chloramines and you will occasionally need to replenish lost salt. Salt used should be 99% clean pellets, such as that used in water softening systems, and while we do not sell salt, it is readily found at many locations. Please consult your operations manual for manufacturer’s recommendations. Eastgate Pool’s Water Professionals will be glad to assist you with any questions you might have. Don’t hesitate to ask.

pH pH is not as familiar to most people as chlorine is, but it is just as important. pH is a measure of whether something is acidic, basic, or neutral, and it is always measured on a scale of 0 to 14. Everything has a pH value associated with it. A pH of 7.0 is neutral, a pH under 7.0 is acidic, and a pH over 7.0 is basic.

pH Scale
Acid Neutral Basic 0 7 14

pH is important to swimming pool water for many reasons, and as such, it cannot be neglected without problems occurring. On a swimming pool, the pH should be kept in the following range:

If the pH is not kept in the proper range, the pool owner may experience the following problems:

page6image1474486000

Recommended pH Range – 7.2 to 7.6

pH Level

Problem

pH Too Low

•Corrodes surfaces and equipment •Wrinkles and fades vinyl liners •Increases chlorine consumption •Irritates swimmers’ skin and eyes

pH Too High

•Scales pool surfaces and equipment •Contributes to cloudy water
•Drops efficiency of chlorine •Irritates swimmers’ skin and eyes

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Of the problems associated with an improper pH, the one that should be of the most interest to the pool owner is the drop in the efficiency of chlorine at a high pH. It is not uncommon when we perform water tests to find pools’ with a pH of 8.0 or above. Unfortunately, at this pH level, the chlorine level must be kept 2 to 3 times higher in order to achieve the same sanitizing level as is achieved at a pH of 7.2 to 7.6. The result is that the pool owner either wastes money by having to keep the chlorine level at an elevated level or their pool water turns cloudy or green. Neither scenario is necessary or desirable.

The pool’s pH is crucial, and luckily, fairly easy to test for and adjust. All swimming pool test kits should test for pH, and by now you’ve probably become familiar with how to use your test kit or strips. Once you have tested the water and obtained your results, you can make any needed adjustments to the pH.

If the pH tests low, you will use SPARCO pH Plus. To determine how much pH Plus to add, you will need to know your pH test results and your pool’s capacity. The label on the container of pH Plus will then instruct you on how much product to add.

If the pH tests high, you will need to add SPARCO pH Minus or Muriatic Acid. SPARCO pH Minus is a granular product where as Muriatic Acid is a liquid product. (For safety reasons, pH minus is normally the preferred product to use.) To determine how much pH Minus to add, carry out the same procedure as described for a low pH. When adding pH Minus or acid, never add it through the skimmer and, choose an area away from metal ladders or other metal components.

For you and your family’s safety, always wear protective goggles and gloves when handling muriatic acid. Wash any spills off of clothing or pool decking and equipment immediately.

TOTAL ALKALINITY No discussion of pH would be complete without looking at total alkalinity. Total alkalinity is a measure of alkaline materials in the pool water. While this doesn’t mean much to most of us, what is important is that these alkaline materials play a significant role in helping to maintain the pool’s pH. These alkaline materials help prevent changes in the pool’s pH. At proper total alkalinity levels, the pool’s pH will be more stable. This stabilizing is referred to as buffering the pH.

On vinyl lined swimming pools, the total alkalinity should be kept at the following levels:

Total Alkalinity – 80 to 150 Parts Per Million

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In the event that the total alkalinity is out of range, the following problems may occur:

Alkalinity Level

Problem

Total Alkalinity Too Low

•pH is difficult to maintain – It drifts •Corrodes surfaces and equipment •Stains pool surfaces

Total Alkalinity Too High

•pH is difficult to adjust – It remains fixed •Scales pool equipment and surfaces
•Makes water cloudy
•Since pH stays high, sanitizer efficiency drops

Depending on your test kit, you may or may not be able to test for total alkalinity at home. If you can’t test total alkalinity at home, bring us a water sample three or four times during the season and we’ll test it for you.

Pools with low total alkalinity levels need SPARCO Alkalinity Plus added to them. This product is a powder and is very easy to add. For the proper dosages, see the container’s label or use the following chart.

TO RAISE TOTAL ALKALINITY WITH SPARCO ALKALINITY PLUS

GALLONS OF

WATER

DESIRED INCREASE IN PARTS PER MILLION(ppm)

10 ppm

20 ppm

30 ppm

40 ppm

50 ppm

60 ppm

70 ppm

80 ppm

90 ppm

100 ppm

1000

2.40 oz.

4.80 oz.

7.20 oz.

9.60 oz.

12.0 oz.

14.4 oz.

1.05 lbs.

1.20 lbs.

1.35 lbs.

1.50 lbs.

5000

12.0 oz.

1.50 lbs.

2.25 lbs.

3.00 lbs.

3.75 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

5.25 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

6.75 lbs.

7.50 lbs.

10000

1.50 lbs.

3.00 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

7.50 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

10.5 lbs.

12.0 lbs.

13.5 lbs.

15.0 lbs.

15000

2.25 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

6.75 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

11.25 lbs.

13.5 lbs.

15.75 lbs.

18.0 lbs.

20.25 lbs.

22.5 lbs.

20000

3.00 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

12.0 lbs.

15.0 lbs.

18.0 lbs.

21.0 lbs.

24.0 lbs.

27.0 lbs.

30.0 lbs.

High total alkalinity pools require SPARCO pH Minus. You will need to use the dosage as recommended on the container or use the chart below.

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TO LOWER TOTAL ALKALINITY WITH SPARCO pH MINUS

GALLONS OF

WATER

DESIRED DECREASE IN PARTS PER MILLION(ppm)

10 ppm

20 ppm

30 ppm

40 ppm

50 ppm

60 ppm

70 ppm

80 ppm

90 ppm

100 ppm

1000

2.40 oz.

4.80 oz.

7.20 oz.

9.60 oz.

12.0 oz.

14.4 oz.

1.05 lbs.

1.20 lbs.

1.35 lbs.

1.50 lbs.

5000

12.0 oz.

1.50 lbs.

2.25 lbs.

3.00 lbs.

3.75 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

5.25 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

6.75 lbs.

7.50 lbs.

10000

1.50 lbs.

3.00 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

7.50 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

10.5 lbs.

12.0 lbs.

13.5 lbs.

15.0 lbs.

15000

2.25 lbs.

4.50 lbs.

6.75 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

11.25 lbs.

13.5 lbs.

15.75 lbs.

18.0 lbs.

20.25 lbs.

22.5 lbs.

20000

3.00 lbs.

6.00 lbs.

9.00 lbs.

12.0 lbs.

15.0 lbs.

18.0 lbs.

21.0 lbs.

24.0 lbs.

27.0 lbs.

30.0 lbs.

In the event that the pH and total alkalinity both need adjusted, always adjust the total alkalinity first, since this acts as a buffer for the pH.

CALCIUMHARDNESS Calciumhardnessisameasureofdissolvedcalciuminthepool’swater. For the most part, calcium hardness is not an item that the pool owner needs to monitor continuously. Having Eastgate check the water several times a year is sufficient in most cases. The reason for not needing to have this tested as often is because it does not change near as quickly as the chlorine, pH, and total alkalinity do.

The calcium hardness should be kept in the following range:

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Calcium Hardness – 120 to 300 Parts Per Million

If the calcium hardness is out of range, the pool owner may see the following problems:

Hardness Level

Problem

Calcium Hardness Too Low

•Corrodes pool equipment

Calcium Hardness Too High

•Makes water cloudy
•Scaling may form on equipment and surfaces

Since calcium hardness will usually be tested at our store, any recommended action , if needed, will be prescribed when we test the water.

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Please note that soft water is NOT good in pools and spas. Soft water is highly corrosive and will lead to corrosion on any metal component, such as ladders, skimmer screws, and incandescent light housing. In addition, soft water is very difficult to keep in balance. Again, just bring in a water sample and we will be glad to analyze your water and make professional suggestions.

Specialized Chemistry Considerations

Even the best cared for and “balanced” pool will need a few other chemical additions to its water to keep things looking clean and clear. The swimming pool industry refers to these other chemicals as “specialty chemicals.” These specialty chemicals help reduce overall chemical usage as well as maintenance time.

CYANURIC ACID Of all the specialty chemicals, cyanuric acid is among the most important. Cyanuric acid is important to the pool owner because its use can help reduce the use of chlorine. Cyanuric acid, which is also called stabilizer or conditioner, helps to reduce the rate at which the sun depletes the free chlorine in the water. By slowing the depletion rate, less chlorine will

be used. Since chlorine is the biggest chemical expense that a pool will have, it makes sense to make sure your pool is stabilized. The cost of stabilizer will be made up for in chlorine savings.

Many forms of chlorine have stabilizer built into them, requiring the pool owner to only have to establish the initial cyanuric acid level. Once this level is established, a stabilized chlorine will be able to maintain this level unless significant amounts of new water are added. The recommended cyanuric acid level is as such:

page10image1503118288 page10image1503118608

Cyanuric Acid – 30 to 125 Parts Per Million

The result of too low or too high of a stabilizer reading are:

Cyanuric Level

Problem

Cyanuric Acid Too Low

•Increased chlorine consumption

Cyanuric Acid Too High

•Chlorine becomes locked

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Historically, we do not see many cases where the stabilizer level is high enough to cause the chlorine not to work, but it can happen if not enough fresh water is added to a pool over time. On a new pool, especially, this chlorine lock is not something to worry about.

For the most part, test kits designed for home use do not test cyanuric acid. Cyanuric acid is easily tested for on our professional equipment, and we will be happy to test your pool’s water anytime that you have questions or concerns. After we have the test results, we will advise you whether or not SPARCO Chlorine Conditioner & Stabilizer needs to be added.

ALGAECIDE Whenyoulookatpoolproblems,themostcommononeiswithoutadoubt,algae.There are several reasons for this problem being so widespread. The first reason is improper maintenance. Inadequate chlorine levels, improper water balance, and improper filtration can all play a part in the growth of algae. Because algae can develop in such a short time, the importance of regular testing cannot be stressed enough. A couple of minutes can save you countless hours and dollars. But more importantly, the small time investment keeps your pool fun, which is probably why you purchased it in the first place.

The second reason why algae is such a common problem on swimming pools is that algae is a very tough and resourceful plant. Algae is a primitive plant, so it is definitely not a new problem. While proper chlorine and pH levels will go a long way towards preventing algae growth, there will be times that for one reason or another, the water chemistry is not exactly where it needs to be. It is for this reason that SPARCO Algae Destroyer should be used on a regular basis. Algae Destroyer is a broad spectrum algaecide which not only kills algae, but also helps to prevent its emergence. The use of Algae Destroyer gives the pool owner another line of defense against the most common pool problem. On a weekly basis, you should add 4.3 to 8.6 ounces of Algae Destroyer per 10,000 gallons of water. For convenience, we recommend adding Algae Destroyer each week when you shock your pool.

If your pool does get algae, the first thing that you will need to do is to check and to adjust the water balance. The pool should then be shocked and a dose of Algae Destroyer added. (See dosage rate on Algae Destroyer for a pool with visible algae growth.) It is important that these treatments beginas soon as possible due to the speed with which algae can grow. Also, algae is easier to kill when it is immature. The longer algae is left untreated, the more of it you will have, and the harder it will be to kill. During treatment for algae, the filter should be run continuously until the problem is remedied. (See Filtration & Vacuuming sections of this manual for more tips on dealing with an algae problem.

METAL REMOVERS Depending on the source water for the pool, metals may be present in the water. Testing for these metals will be done by your pool dealer, as few home test kits will test for them. (The most common metals tested for are copper and iron.) If metals are found in your water, an Eastgate employee will instruct you on how to handle them. If these metals are not removed or made “inactive”, they can potentially cause staining.

IMPORTANT NOTE: If your pool’s water turns colored the first time chlorine is added, it is probably due to metals in the water. The chlorine oxidizes the metals which leads to the discoloration. To remedy this problem, bring a water sample to Eastgate Pools and we will analyze the water and make recommenda- tions on what steps will need to be taken. Fortunately, this is a very uncommon problem.

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WATER CLARIFIERS While algae is the number one pool water problem, cloudy water is not far behind. In fact, in most cases of heavy algae growth in a pool, the pool will go through a cloudy phase either before green is visible or after the green is gone. (Note, cloudy water can have causes other that algae, but proportionately, algae is the number one cause of cloudy water.)

In the early stages of algae growth, it is quite common for the pool walls and bottom to get “slimy” while the actual water begins to turn cloudy. If not shocked and balanced quickly, the pool water will quickly progress to green. If at anytime you see cloudy water developing, immediately check the pool’s chemical levels. In most cases, the chlorine level will be very low. The quicker the pool is shocked and balanced, the better the likelihood that a major algae problem can be avoided.

Cloudy water is also a very common problem after a pool has had a major algae problem. The reason for this cloudiness is that after the pool has been shocked and treated with algaecide, the algae may be killed, but it just won’t disappear. The dead algae remains in the pool water leaving a milky, or cloudy appearance. These dead algae cells are very difficult to filter out due to their extremely small size. When you are fighting a major algae problem, you should expect to see the water go from dark green to light green to cloudy. As you see these changes taking place, you will know that the algae is being killed.

As was mentioned, dead algae is very difficult to filter out. In order to help the filter, clarifiers are used. Clarifiers work by taking small particles and helping to clump them together so that they are easier to filter. Clarifiers come in varying strengths, and for extremely cloudy pools we recommend SPARCO Crystal Clear clarifier. In some cases, a clarifier will not be strong enough to do the job, and in these cases SPARCO Super Floc should be used.

In the event that your pool has a clarity problem, Eastgate Pools will be happy to test your pool’s water and make recommendations on the proper steps to take to remedy the problem. Our hope is that with this manual and with our personalized help, we can help you maintain your pool so that you never need to worry about cloudy water problems.

CHLORINE GENERATING SYSTEM

This is one of the easiest ways to keep your pool chlorinated. With the Chlorine Generating System, salt is added directly to the pool water. The Chlorine Generating System then generates chlorine from the sodium chloride compound. It is also equipped with a “super chlorination or boost” setting that will further reduce daily maintenance. For specific operation please refer to your Chlorine Gener- ating System owner’s manual. When having your water tested by an Eastgate Pools water expert, please remember to advise them that your pool is equipped with the Chlorine Generating System.

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CHEMICAL SUMMARY Theprecedingsectionhasgivenafairlydetailedoverviewofswim- ming pool chemistry, and it may have you wondering just what you’ve gotten yourself into by purchasing a pool. Fear not! If you test the pool on a regular basis, paying close attention to the water’s chlorine and pH levels, pool problems will be minimized. The vast majority of pool water problems are created when the chlorine level is allowed to drop below its acceptable level. When you add in improper pH levels, problems soon develop. A couple minutes investment on your part to test the water will pay huge dividends in time, fun, and money. The other chemical levels and chemical additions are important, but the chlorine and pH levels are absolutely crucial.

Baquacil users please see your Baquacil Pool Care Guide or ask an Eastgate sales associate for more information.

Water Test Summary

Test

Range

Free Chlorine

1.0 – 3.0 ppm

Combined Chlorine

< 0.3 ppm

pH

7.2 – 7.6

Total Alkalinity

80 – 150 ppm

Calcium Hardness

120 – 300 ppm

Cyanuric Acid

30 – 125ppm

Metals

0 ppm

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Opening your above ground swimming pool

If your pool has been properly closed and if it is opened on a timely basis, it should be fairly easy to open. In years past, many people wouldn’t open their pools until after Memorial Day. The problem with this time frame is that by Memorial Day we have normally already had quite a bit of warm, if not, hot weather. By mid to late May, winterizing chemicals have lost most of their effectiveness. As the water temperature increases, so does the prospect of algae. Besides potential water problems, opening the pool this late takes away from the swimming season. It isn’t uncommon to be able to swim in the early to middle part of May. For this reason, many pool owners have begun to open their pools in April. The steps below will walk you through the proper opening procedure.

Please note, these directions are intended mainly for aboveground pools.

  1. Use either a cover pump or a siphon to remove as much water as possible from the cover. At over 8 pounds per gallon, the water’s weight can add up quickly. Note: as a cover gets older, water will sometimes be able to pass through the cover easily. While the cover is draining, start filling the pool to the required level, which is about half way up the skimmer.
  2. After the cover has been drained, carefully remove it from the pool. This step is normally a job for a couple of people. It is important that no edge of the cover be allowed to drop into the pool, so keep a close eye on all edges of the cover. If an edge does drop, most of the dirt will flow right into the pool.
  3. Reinstall the filtration sytem. If the sand is more than two years old, now would be a good time to change it. Use only certified silicia sand. Eastgate Pools & Spas carries this sand in 50 pound bags. Your owner’s manual will list the proper amount of sand for your filter. If you have a cartridge filter, older than one-half season, we suggest changing it per manufacturer’s recommendation.
  4. Adjust the pool’s water chemistry. It is best to bring a water sample into the store for your Eastgate Professionals to test. We provide this service FREE and encourage you to take advantage of this service. We will let you know what chemicals you need to balance your water. (Please bring about 8 ounces of water. Sample water should be removed from 18″ or deeper.)
  5. Vacuum any debris from your pool and begin regular maintenance. Hose down and scrub the cover. After the cover has completely dried on both sides, fold it up and store it away. It is best to store the cover in a location where ants and small animals cannot get to it. We recommend you place your cover inside a heavy plastic bag, then seal it up. This reduces the possibility of damage.

Eastgate Pools & Spas and the pool and equipment manufacturers of your swimming pool and its components assume no liability for improperly opened pools.

Above ground pool winterization

Many people think that a pool must be drained several inches below a skimmer, with the skimmer being left open for water to drain. Unfortunately, water can still accumulate in a skimmer, which will cause it to crack when a freeze occurs. Also, this puts much more stress on the winter cover and can cause it to rip or tear. We recommend the following alternative method.

  1. Vacuum your pool clean. Remove all leaves and debris. If you have any leaks in the liner, LOCATE THEM AND PATCH THEM NOW. FAILURE TO DO SO COULD RESULT IN YOUR POOL COLLAPSING DURING THE WINTER DUE TO WATER LOSS.
  2. Balance pool water to proper pH, alkalinity, and calcium levels.
  3. Add Maintain Winter Kit(s), per instructions. If your pool is equipped with the SimpleSalt System, add Shield Winterizer instead and circulate for 6 hours before proceedingto the next step.
  4. Backwash sand or zeosand filters. Clean cartridge or D.E. filters
  5. If you have a cartridge or grid D.E. filter, make sure these are completely dry beforestoring for the winter. Store in a plastic bag that is sealed tightly.
  6. Remove all ladders, drop-in steps, pool lights, floats, and solar covers.
  7. Inspect your pool wall thoroughly. Make sure the skimmer and return gaskets are stilldoing their job. Any leaks detected should be fixed IMMEDIATELY. Do not wait until spring. Failure to do so will cause the wall to deteriorate quickly and damage to walls at the skimmer or return are not covered by the manufacturer’s warranty.
  8. With the filtration system ‘off’, remove the eyeball retainer on the return fixture. Some returns, including those sold by Eastgate Pools & Spas since 2000, require the removal of the inner core of the return. If this will not easily screw out, we have a removal tool available at minimal cost. Use a screw-in winter plug if possible or use a rubber stopper plug on the inside of the pool.
  9. Place an appropriate winter plug in the skimmer. This plug is to be placed inside the skimmer and not from under the skimmer. Stuff the skimmer with packaging material making sure it goes all the way to the bottom. Also, extend a little bit out through the opening into the pool. An even better option is the use of a Skimmer Plug. This is a great device that helps seal off the skimmer opening, helping you conserve water. Your Eastgate Pools & Spas pool professional will be happy to show one to you and demonstrate how easy it is to use.
  10. Disconnect hoses or PVC plumbing lines. Place all o-rings in a plastic bag and store away.
  11. Remove all drain plugs from your filter, pump, chlorinator, or FROG cycler. DO NOT PUT THEM BACK IN—LEAVE THEM OUT FOR THE WINTER. (In areas of extremely high calcium we recommend that sand be emptied from your filter before winterizing. Calcium can collect in a filter and not let it drain properly. FREEZE DAMAGE OF ANY KIND IS NOT COVERED BY MANUFACTUERW ARRANTY .
  12. Clean any waterline buildup using SC 4000.
  13. Inflate an air pillow to approximately 3⁄4 of capacity. Overfilling will cause it to popwhen the water freezes. Secure in middle of pool using string attached to the pillow’s grommet. Tie off to toprails.
  1. Place the cover on your pool. The black side goes down.
  2. String the cable through the eyelets and tighten the cover using the cinch.
  3. Using 2 cover clips between each upright, secure the cover to the toprail.Alternatively, use Winter Seal to protect the cover from high winds. DO NOT HANG JUGS FROM COVER EYELETS. THIS PLACES EXCESSIVE STRESS ON THE COVER AND WILL RIP IT, VOIDING ALL WARRANTIES.
  4. Add approximately one inch of water to the cover. During the winter, when there is a thaw, pump accumulated water off the top of the cover. Eastgate Pools offers a variety of cover pumps. Make sure your pool’s level does not drop excessively. This would indicate that your cover has a small hole in it and that water is being pulled through the cover. DO NOT LEAVE A COVER PUMP UNATTENDED AS YOU COULD ACCIDENTLY DRAIN YOUR POOL.

18. If you have issues with leaves accumulating on your cover, we recommend you use a Genius Leaf Cover on top of the winter cover. Remove it when all leaves have fallen, clean, and store it away for the rest of the winter. DO NOT LEAVE IT ON ALL WINTER AS THIS WILL DAMAGE THE LEAF COVER.

Other frequently asked questions

Swimming Pools

Q. How often should I backwash my filter?
A. Sand filters are more efficient with some debris. Backwash when your pressure gauge shows 7 – 10 pounds of pressure above normal. Water clarity will be much improved and your pool will be cleaner.

Q. Why do my children’s eyes burn when swimming?
A. More than likely the pH of the pool is very low. We can test your water and help you adjust it properly. This should solve your problem.

Q. When I put my solar cover on my pool, do the bubbles go up or down?
A. The bubbles go down.

Q. Why does my pool have a strong chlorine smell?
A. The Free and Total Chlorine are out of balance. Super shock it to get it back in balance.

Q. How much liquid chlorine (shock) should I use to shock my pool?
A. The recommended rate is 1 gallon for every 10,000 gallons of water.

Q. What can I do to prevent my pool from turning cloudy after heavy use from a pool party or a big rainstorm?
A. As soon as the party is over or immediately after a big storm (over 1 inch of rain) shock the pool.

Q. How often should I shock my pool?
A. Depending on usage, we recommend regular shocking once a week. If there is heavier usage, shock immediately after a big party.

Q. Can I use petroleum jelly to lubricate my pool o-rings?
A. No. Petroleum jelly will harden and make it difficult to remove a lid or replace the o-ring. Use silicone or Teflon lubricant specifically made for o-rings.

Q. Which is a better shock to use on a vinyl liner pool – liquid or powder?
A. We recommend using Power Magic dry shock. It is superior to liquid shock because it has a long shelf life AND because it contains sodium tetraborates. Borates effectively combat algae by reducing algae’s ability to absorb CO2, one of two things algae must have to survive. Simply dissolve the Power Magic in a bucket of water and pour directly into the pool. Some of the calcium may not dissolve immediately but this will not hurt your liner.

Q. How often should I test my pool water?
A. We recommend twice a week at home.

Q. How often should I bring my water in to be tested at Eastgate Pools & Spas?
A. At the very beginning of the season and the end of the season. Then once a month should be fine unless you think you have a water balance problem.

Q. How often should I change the sand in my sand filter?
A. Every three to five years or per the manufacturer’s recommendation.

Q. What should I do, I have quite a bit of dirt and debris on the bottom of my pool?
A. Vacuum on waste.

Q. Do I need to fence my yard?
A. It depends on the requirements of your township or county. Please check with your specific township or county for requirements.

Q. What part of the installation am I responsible for?
A. You are responsible for knowing and following your township or county requirements, obtaining the proper permits, providing reasonable access to the installation site and for all aspects of the electrical wiring. If you need help finding an electrician, we would be happy to assist you.

Q. How early can I have my pool installed?
A. It depends on your yard and the weather. If your yard is dry and you reserve your pool early, it can be installed as early as late April or early May.

Q. I have an aboveground pool and want to put on a salt-system chlorine generator. Will this work and is it a good alternative to chlorine tablets?
A. We do not recommend straight salt systems on aboveground pools. In general, they don’t generate enough chlorine and the corrosive effects of high salt levels can rust out walls and tracks. Many pool manufacturers void your warranty if you go to a high concentration salt system. They are great for quality inground pools with commercial galvanization but not abovegrounds.

Q. Is there a better alternative to standard chlorine sanitization for aboveground pools?
A. Yes! We recommend the Simple Salt Water Treatment System. This is a hybrid system that uses only a very small, controlled dose of salt, along with sodium tetraborates, and other water enhancers. Water feels much softer and the borates are extremely effective at fighting algae. It is also very easy to use and low maintenance.

Q. What do you mean by “low maintenance”?
A. Low Maintenance means you, the pool owner, work less to enjoy the pool more. With the Simple Salt System, the primary component is added just once a year – at the pool opening. Other components require no more than 5 minutes every week or two.

Q. How long should I run my filter?
A. Filters with single speed pumps should run at least 12 – 14 hours per day, 7 days a week. Filters with 2 speed pumps should run on low 24 hours per day and are only required to run on high when vacuuming or adding water care products.

Q. Should I cover my pool when I’m not using it?
A. This depends on your personal preference. In the summer, a solar cover will retain the heat, keep debris out of your pool and save on chemical consumption. In the winter, we highly recommend that you cover your pool.

Q. How do I winterize/open my pool?
A. Our sales staff would be glad to help you with any questions regarding winterizing or opening your pool.

Q. Should I do anything after covering my pool for the winter?
A. Prolong your cover’s life by keeping accumulated water pumped off. After removing your cover in the spring, clean it, dry it and store it in a sealed container to keep the mice away.

Q. My pool motor is whining, should I do anything?
A. At the first sound of a pool motor’s whining, take action. A new set of bearings now may save you the expense of a new motor later. Also, make sure there are no leaks at the pump seal. This is an easy and inexpensive repair.

Spas & Hot Tubs

Q. What part of the spa delivery and installation will I be responsible for?
A. Unless we specify otherwise, a spa will include delivery, professional orientation, and placement where you want it. You will be responsible for preparing the site, reasonable access to the site and all aspects of wiring (to the spa manufacturer’s specifications.) If you need help finding an electrician, we will be happy to assist you.

Q. What if I have a problem with my spa?
A. We have our own service department and service all of the spas that we sell. We also have a well-trained sales staff to address your non-technical questions.

Q. Can I leave my spa outside all winter?
A. Yes! Many of our customers feel that winter is the best time to use their spas.

Q. What if I want to drain my spa for the winter?
A. If you drain your spa for the winter, you must be sure to winterize it properly. Any water left in the spa can freeze, causing unnecessary damage.

Q. Are your spas gas or electric?
A. All of our spas we sell are electric. Due to advances in spa technology, running your spa on electric is very efficient and convenient.

Q. Will my electric bills go up? If so, how much?
A. Your electric bills will increase. The cost will depend on which brand spa you pick and the way it is engineered (All spas are not the same.) The cost to operate a spa can be as little as $20.00 a month.

Q. Do I have to change my water?
A. You should change the water every 3 – 4 months. Our sales staff would be happy to help you learn about maintaining your water.

Q. Can I use petroleum jelly to lubricate my spa o-rings?
A. No. Petroleum jelly will harden and make it difficult to remove a lid. Use silicone or Teflon lubricant specifically made for o-rings.

Q. Can I leave my spa uncovered?
A. We recommend keeping your spa covered. Heated water evaporates quickly and this can lead to moisture problems if your spa is indoors. If your spa is outside, dust, pollen and leaves can make your spa experience less enjoyable.

Billiards

Q. Do you carry slate pool tables?
A. Yes! All of the tables we sell are slate.

Q. Why should I buy a slate pool table instead of a “slate-like” table?
A. Slate will last a lifetime. It will never warp or wear out. Tables that are not slate use materials made from wood products. Over time, these materials can absorb moisture that will cause warping and other types of wear.

Q. What size is regulation size?
A. Regulations call for a table with a length that is double the width. The most common home tables are 4′ x 8′.

Q. What type cloth do you put on your tables?
A. Our tables come standard with commercial grade, 21 oz., wool-nylon blend cloth in the color of your choice. We use a wool-nylon blend which provides an optimal blend between playability and durabiltiy.

Q. Do you carry any other types of game tables or billiard accessories?
A. We have a large selection of foosball, air hockey, table tennis, 3 in 1’s, dartboards and more. We stock a variety of billiard lamps and accessories. And we also carry a large selection of bar stools.

Q. Do you install your own pool tables?
A. Yes! We are fully staffed to install your new table as soon as you need it.

Q. What about replacement cloth for my existing table?
A. We stock replacement cloth in many colors.

Casual Furniture

Q. Will you deliver patio furniture to my home?
A. Yes, we do offer fast, convenient service.

Q. Do your tables have regular or tempered glass?
A. All of the glass tables we sell are tempered glass.

Q. What is the difference between wicker and all-weather wicker?
A. Wicker is a natural wood product that, when exposed to moisture, can break down over time. All-weather wicker is a synthetic, water resistant product.

Q. Can I special order my furniture in a different color?
A. Yes! We do offer the option to special order, so you can customize your furniture to fit your needs. We have fabric and frame samples available at our store for your convenience.

Q. What types of accessories do you offer?
A. We carry umbrellas and bases in a variety of colors and styles as well as a full line of furniture covers. We also have a selection of outdoor lights, fireburners, fountains and more.

Q. I don’t want a glass top table, are there any other options?
A. We stock quite a few non-glass table alternatives including aluminum slat top, porcelain tile, cast aluminum and more.

Q. Can I leave my umbrella up all the time?
A. An unattended umbrella on casual furniture is an invitation to disaster. Our weather changes quickly and a raised umbrella can tip over, breaking both the umbrella and the table. Always lower your umbrella when not in use.

Q. Do you carry other casual furniture besides standard patio tables and chairs?
A. Yes! We carry bistro and bar height sets as well as conversation and gas firepit sets. We also have a wide selection of side tables, ottomans, recliner and lounge chairs.

Q. How often should I seal my speciality tabletop?
A. Check with your salesperson on the specific requirements for your tabletop. Some tabletops require specific products to be used in sealing while other materials require no special care.

Hot Tubs + Spas

Spa water chemistry

How many gallons of water does your spa hold?

This seemingly simple question is extremely important when you consider that the most common spa models will hold anywhere from 150 to 550 gallons of water. A 400 gallon variance on a 20,000 pool is hardly noticeable, but on a spa, what a difference! Please check your owner’s manual or if your spa was purchased from Eastgate Pools & Spas we will get you the information you need.

Testing Your Spa Water

While your spa’s water capacity is extremely important to know, it is also important to know what the chemical levels are in the spa. Proper chemical levels in the spa help ensure that the water is invitingly clear, clean, and healthy.

To save time and money, there is no more important thing that you can do than to test your pool’s water. It is regular testing that helps ensure water that is of exceptional quality. Failure to test the spa on a regular basis will almost assuredly result in extra work and expenditures for you. As an example, running your spa with a low pH can ruin the spa’s heating element. (Heating elements damaged by improper water chemistry are not covered by your spa manufacturer’s warranty.) This problem and others are a direct result of improper water chemistry, which is a consequence of infrequent water testing.

If water chemistry balance is so important, just how often should you test your spa? The answer to this question will vary somewhat depending on how often your spa is used. A spa’s water chemistry balance changes dramatically with use. Consider, if you will, that 4 people in a 300 gallon spa is nearly equivalent to having 270 people in a 16′ x 32′ inground swimming pool. As a person uses a spa, their body will naturally release body oils and perspiration into the water. These wastes greatly affect the spa’s water chemistry balance.

For home spas with average usage, testing the spa three times per week will normally suffice. When testing, always wait at least one hour after the spa has been used before taking the test.

To test the spa water, Eastgate Pools & Spas recommends the use of Test Strips. For exact instructions on how to use the test strips, please refer to the package of test strips. If you have any question on their use, please let us know.

Chemical Levels

Now that you have learned how to use the test strips to test the spa water, you will probably wonder what it all means. What is the significance of the bromine, pH, and total alkalinity readings that you have obtained? Are there any other chemical levels to worry about?

At this time, we would like to take a look at the basics of spa water chemistry. Each of the important parameters will be looked at individually. We will also discuss their importance to each other. By keeping these chemicals in the proper range, you will increase the life of your spa as well as your enjoyment of it.

Balance Water

When talking about balanced water, we are talking about water that will neither corrode nor scale. Balanced water helps keep metal pipes and heating elements from corroding. Balanced water also helps prevent scale deposits from forming on spa surfaces, pipes and on heating elements. These scale deposits reduce the spa equipment’s efficiency. The above description tells why balanced water is important, but it does not address what balanced water actually is. Water is said to be balanced when the pH, total alkalinity and calcium hardness are within given ranges.

pH

pH is a measure of whether something is acidic, basic, or neutral, and it is always measured on a scale of 0 to 14. Everything has a pH value associated with it. A pH of 7.0 is neutral, a pH under 7.0 is acidic, and a pH over 7.0 is basic.

Acidic page2image1504308720Basic

Your spas pH is important for many reasons, and as such, it cannot be neglected without problems occurring. On a spa, the pH should be kept in the following range:

Recommended pH Range – 7.2 to 7.8

If the pH is not kept in the proper range, the spa owner may experience the following problems:

page2image1504289936 page2image1504290816

pH Level

page2image1504270144

Problem

pH Too Low

  •   Corrodes surfaces and equipment
  •   Irritates user’s skin and eyes

pH Too High

page2image1504234208 page2image1504235056

  •   Scales spa surfaces and equipment
  •   Contributes to cloudy water
  •   Irritates user’s skin and eyes

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The spa’s pH is important and is fairly easy to test for and adjust. All swimming pool/spa test kits should test for pH, and by now you’ve probably become familiar with how to use your test

strips. Once you have tested the water and obtained your results, you can make any needed adjustments to the pH.

If the pH tests low, you will use pH Increase. As per the manufacturer’s directions, add this product while the pump is running. Liquid pH Increase should be added one ounce at a time. After a minimum of thirty minutes to an hour, retest the pH and adjust further if needed.

If the pH tests high, you will need to add Liquid pH Decrease. When adding Liquid pH Decrease, it is recommended that you mix one ounce of pH decrease to five gallons of water. This solution should then be added to the spa. The spa should be circulating. After a minimum of thirty minutes to an hour, retest the pH and adjust further if needed.

TOTAL ALKALINITY

No discussion of pH would be complete without looking at total alkalinity. Total alkalinity is a measure of alkaline materials in the spa water. While this doesn’t mean much to most of us, what is important is that these alkaline materials play a significant role in helping to maintain the spa’s pH. These alkaline materials help prevent changes in the spa’s pH. At proper total alkalinity levels, the spa’s pH will be more stable. This stabilizing is referred to as buffering the pH.

The total alkalinity on your spas should be kept at the following levels:

Total Alkalinity – 80 to 140 Parts Per Million

In the event that the total alkalinity is out of range, the following problems may occur:

page3image1504057456 page3image1504055568

Alkalinity Level

page3image1504023584 page3image1504024400

Problem

page3image1504027664 page3image1504028832

Total Alkalinity Too Low

  •   pH is difficult to maintain – it drifts
  •   Corrodes surfaces and equipment
  •   Stains spa surfaces

Total Alkalinity Too High

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  •   pH is difficult to adjust – it remains fixed
  •   Scales equipment and surfaces
  •   Makes water cloudy
  •   Since pH stays high, sanitizer efficiency drops

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Spas with low total alkalinity levels need pH Buffer added to them. This product is a powder and is very easy to add. For the proper dosages, see the container’s label.

High total alkalinity spas require the same chemical as is used on a spa with high pH (pH

Decrease). You will need to use the dosage as recommended on the container.

If you want to save your spa’s equipment and also save money on chemicals, then keeping the total alkalinity in range is a must. In the event that the pH and total alkalinity both need adjusted, always adjust the total alkalinity first since this acts as a buffer for the pH.

CALCIUM HARDNESS

Calcium hardness is a measure of dissolved calcium in the spa’s water. While calcium hardness is important to water balance, it is not as frequently tested as pH and total alkalinity. In fact, most consumer test strips do not test calcium hardness. As such, periodically have your water tested by Eastgate Pools & Spas so that we can advise you as to what treatment, if any, is needed.

The calcium hardness should be kept in the following range:

Calcium Hardness – 120 to 250 Parts Per Million

If the calcium hardness is out of range, the spa owner may see the following problems:

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Hardness Level

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Problem

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calcium Hardness Too Low

 Corrodes spa equipment

calcium Hardness Too High

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  •   Makes water cloudy
  •   Scaling may form on equipment and surfaces

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Since calcium hardness will usually be tested at our store, any recommended action , if needed, will be prescribed when we test the water. In general, spa water with low calcium hardness will need a calcium increaser, and spa water with a high calcium hardness level will need to have the water either changed or diluted with fresh water. It is also possible to control calcium by using Stain & Scale Remover.

While Stain & Scale Remover will not remove the calcium from the water, it will help to keep the calcium from coming out of solution and depositing on the spa and its equipment. Regular use of this product is essential no matter what the calcium level is for your spa water due to

how calcium reacts in hot water.

Unlike most items that dissolve in water, calcium is less soluble as the water temperature increases. What happens on spas is that the heating element will be the first place for the calcium to deposit due to its high temperature. If you see calcium deposits on the spa surface, you can almost be guaranteed that the heater will also be covered with deposits. The use of Stain & Scale Remover will help prevent this problem.

Clean Water

While balanced water is determined by pH, total alkalinity and calcium hardness, clean water is determined by the spa’s sanitizer. When we talk about clean water, we are referring to more than just water that looks nice. We are referring to water that is safe for the users of the spa. Clean water is free of both visible debris as well as invisible debris like bacteria.

BROMINE

While nearly everyone is familiar with chlorine and its role with swimming pools, they may not be as familiar with bromine. Chlorine and bromine are in the same chemical family, but most experts feel that bromione is better suited for the hot water application of a spa. (While chlorine and bromine have many of the same characteristics, bromine is more stable than chlorine in high temperature applications. If chlorine is to be used on a spa, it should be sodium dichlor granular chlorine. Never use chlorine tablets, liquid chlorine or calcium based chlorine. It is also important to note that there are a few spas on which sodium dichlor granular chlorine must be used. These spas cannot safely use bromine because they use a spa shell material that discolor easily. The majority of spas though use what is referred to as cast acrylic. On a cast acrylic spa, bromine is an acceptable option. If your spa did not come from Eastgate Pools & Spas or if you are unsure of your spa’s surface material, please give us a call. We will try to help you determine which sanitizer is right for your spa.)

Bromine Level – 3.0 to 5.0 Parts Per Million

The role of bromine in a spa water is two-fold. The bromine is both a sanitizer as well as an oxidizer. In its sanitizer role, the bromine destroys micro-organisms such as bacteria, algae, fungi and viruses. In its oxidizer role, the bromine “burns-up” organic contaminants such as suntan lotion, body oils, perspiration, dust and dirt. As the bromine sanitizes and oxidizes, it is used up. If the spa is allowed to operate with a low bromine level, the water can become unhealthy and unclean.

The proper bromine level to maintain in a spa is 3.0 to 5.0 ppm. Keeping the level much higher than this level will waste money and is hard on your skin and swimsuit. Letting the level go too low can result in unclean and unhealthy water.

In order to keep the bromine level at the right level in your spa, the first thing to do is add a 2 ounce packet of Sodium Bromine Shock to the freshly filled spa. (One 2 ounce packet per 400 gallons.) This helps establish a bromine residual in the spa. Each time it is drained and refilled, add the proper dosage.

Once the Sodium Bromine Shock is in the spa, Brominating Tablets that you place in your spa’s bromine float will dissolve and provide the bromine that is needed to keep your spa clean. Never add bromine tablets directly to the spa as damage may result. You will have to adjust the amount of water that flow over the tablets in order to control the bromine level. The more holes uncovered on a floating brominator, the more bromine is dissolved into the water, resulting in a higher bromine level.

Nature2 Spa Purifier

As an alternative to bromine, a Nature2 Spa Purifier may be included with your spa. The Nature2 Spa Purifier uses natural minerals to sanitize the spa’s water, coupled with a very small dose of chlorine sanitizer. (In fact, if your spa is equipped with a Nature2 unit, bromine cannot be used in the spa.)

You will still test and maintain your spa’s pH and total alkalinity levels just as you did with bromine or chlorine. You will not, however, be testing for bromine or chlorine. Monopersulfate Test Strips will allow you to measure pH, alkalinity and oxidizer levels.

A Nature2 Purifier must be used in conjunction with Oxidizer, as the Nature2 itself has no oxidizing capabilities. Failure to use the required oxidizer will render the Nature2 useless and will result in cloudy water. Nature2 has a four month life. At the end of four months, it should be replaced.

SPA FROG

This is a specialized in-spa system allows the consumer to sanitize the spa and oxidize organic waste with a minimum amount of effort, thus allowing you to maximize your overall enjoyment. Call or stop in the store and speak with an Eastgate water specialist to learn how to use this system.

OZONE

Ozone is a form of oxygen that is produced when ordinary oxygen is exposed to an ultraviolet light. Ozone is an extremely strong oxidizer and sanitizer. Use of ozone helps to keep the pH and total alkalinity balanced. Eastgate Pools & Spas does not recommend relying on ozone in a spa as a sanitizer. You cannot be assured that there is enough in the water to provide for all of the spa’s sanitizer needs. For this reason, we suggest ozone be used in conjunction with bromine, chlorine or Nature2.

Specialized Chemistry Considerations

Even the best cared for and “balanced” spa will need a few other chemical additions to its water to keep everything in good shape. These other chemicals are commonly referred to as specialty chemicals.

FOAM OUT

It is normal for spas to produce foam when the jets are on high speed. This usually worsens the longer the water is in the spa. To remedy this problem, add a squirt of foam out to the spa water. The bubbles will disappear for a short time while you use your spa. This product is not a permanent solution. Excessive foaming may indicate the need to drain and refill the spa.

SPA PIZAZZ

Even with regular maintenance, spas can develop a water line. To help prevent this line and to help keep the filter clean use Spa Pizazz on a regular basis. It is a natural enzyme based product which breaks down oils.

COVER CLEANER

Of all the parts of the spa that experience usage, none can top the spa’s cover for wear and tear. Cover cleaner will not only keep your spa cover clean, but it will also help keep the vinyl soft, prolonging the life of your cover.

Ordering a spa cover

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Is your spa in need of a new cover?

No problem. Eastgate Pools & Spas can help.

Simply download the order form and provide cover specifications, including length, width, fold location, corner radius, and skirt length. Also provide your name, address, phone, and email address. Don’t worry about completing the cost section. Once you have filled out the information, call us at 513-528-4141 and an associate can provide you with specifics about cover differences, colors, pricing, and ordering.

Please note that Eastgate Pools & Spas does not ship covers out of our immediate service area. All covers are sold for customer pick-up at the store unless local delivery is arranged.

Click Here for the Spa Cover Order Form

You are free to call us if you need additional guidance and we will do our best to assist you over the phone.

Spa cover ordering form

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685 Cincinnati-Batavia Pike Cincinnati, Ohio 45245
513 528-4141

Date:

Home Phone: Cell Phone: Email Address: Salesperson:

Other Dimensions:

Length: Width:

Skirt: (3” Standard): Corners:

Radius: Square:

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Name: Address: City: County:

State:

Zip Code:

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Spa Brand and Model: Cover Style*:

Standard: (4” – 2” Taper) Deluxe: (6” – 4” Taper) FRP Fiber: (5” – 3” Taper)

Color:
Cover Type: (Please Circle)

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Please write dimensions next to or on arrows

Radius Corners

  1. Use two rulers to extend the sides of your spa to a point where the sides would have met (Point B) if the corner had been square.
  2. Points A & C are where the curve ends on the spa.
  3. The radius is the distance in inches from “B to A” or “B to C” – whichever is SMALLER.OR

Trace the outside curve and fax it to us.

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* All Cover thicknesses are approximate.

Approximate Arrival Date:

Cover Cost: Cover Lift:

Other Items:
Delivery Charge:

Subtotal: Tax: Total: Non-Refundable Deposit: Balance Due:

I authorize the cover to be made as specified. All covers come with one handle and two straps on two sides. (We cannot control exact locations of straps or handles.) Once order is placed, there are no refunds. Covers taken from current inventory are not returnable once box is opened.

Customer Signature: Date:

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1/2013

Hot tub desk considerations

Spas continue to grow in popularity as people seek new ways to relax, entertain and communicate with family and friends. Spas are very heavy when filled and require special construction consideration. Your spa may require extra structural support beneath the footwell as this is the area of greatest stress. For spas that use framing systems under the shell, the weight will be distributed more evenly. Still, a four-hundred gallon spa filled with water may weigh in excess of 4,000 pounds, and that’s without anyone in it! If you are having a deck professionally built, make sure to tell your builder if a spa is in your present or future plans. It is easy to reinforce a deck at the time of construction. If doing it yourself, consult with an expert in the spa industry.

Plan for the delivery of the spa. Find out how high the spa can be lifted and ask if handrails need to be removed. For extremely difficult or high lifts, special equipment, such as a cherry-picker, may be available but the cost for these can quickly skew a budget. Before selecting a model, clarify these issues with your retailer.

Frequently asked questions

Q. What part of the spa delivery and installation will I be responsible for?
A. Unless we specify otherwise, a spa will include delivery, professional orientation, and placement where you want it. You will be responsible for preparing the site, reasonable access to the site and all aspects of wiring (to the spa manufacturer’s specifications.) If you need help finding an electrician, we will be happy to assist you.

Q. What if I have a problem with my spa?
A. We have our own service department and service all of the spas that we sell. We also have a well-trained sales staff to address your non-technical questions.

Q. Can I leave my spa outside all winter?
A. Yes! Many of our customers feel that winter is the best time to use their spas.

Q. What if I want to drain my spa for the winter?
A. If you drain your spa for the winter, you must be sure to winterize it properly. Any water left in the spa can freeze, causing unnecessary damage.

Q. Are your spas gas or electric?
A. All of our spas we sell are electric. Due to advances in spa technology, running your spa on electric is very efficient and convenient.

Q. Will my electric bills go up? If so, how much?
A. Your electric bills will increase. The cost will depend on which brand spa you pick and the way it is engineered (All spas are not the same.) The cost to operate a spa can be as little as $20.00 a month.

Q. Do I have to change my water?
A. You should change the water every 3 – 4 months. Our sales staff would be happy to help you learn about maintaining your water.

Q. Can I use petroleum jelly to lubricate my spa o-rings?
A. No. Petroleum jelly will harden and make it difficult to remove a lid. Use silicone or Teflon lubricant specifically made for o-rings.

Q. Can I leave my spa uncovered?
A. We recommend keeping your spa covered. Heated water evaporates quickly and this can lead to moisture problems if your spa is indoors. If your spa is outside, dust, pollen and leaves can make your spa experience less enjoyable.

Billiards

Q. Do you carry slate pool tables?
A. Yes! All of the tables we sell are slate.

Q. Why should I buy a slate pool table instead of a “slate-like” table?
A. Slate will last a lifetime. It will never warp or wear out. Tables that are not slate use materials made from wood products. Over time, these materials can absorb moisture that will cause warping and other types of wear.

Q. What size is regulation size?
A. Regulations call for a table with a length that is double the width. The most common home tables are 4′ x 8′.

Q. What type cloth do you put on your tables?
A. Our tables come standard with commercial grade, 21 oz., wool-nylon blend cloth in the color of your choice. We use a wool-nylon blend which provides an optimal blend between playability and durabiltiy.

Q. Do you carry any other types of game tables or billiard accessories?
A. We have a large selection of foosball, air hockey, table tennis, 3 in 1’s, dartboards and more. We stock a variety of billiard lamps and accessories. And we also carry a large selection of bar stools.

Q. Do you install your own pool tables?
A. Yes! We are fully staffed to install your new table as soon as you need it.

Q. What about replacement cloth for my existing table?
A. We stock replacement cloth in many colors.

Casual Furniture

Q. Will you deliver patio furniture to my home?
A. Yes, we do offer fast, convenient service.

Q. Do your tables have regular or tempered glass?
A. All of the glass tables we sell are tempered glass.

Q. What is the difference between wicker and all-weather wicker?
A. Wicker is a natural wood product that, when exposed to moisture, can break down over time. All-weather wicker is a synthetic, water resistant product.

Q. Can I special order my furniture in a different color?
A. Yes! We do offer the option to special order, so you can customize your furniture to fit your needs. We have fabric and frame samples available at our store for your convenience.

Q. What types of accessories do you offer?
A. We carry umbrellas and bases in a variety of colors and styles as well as a full line of furniture covers. We also have a selection of outdoor lights, fireburners, fountains and more.

Q. I don’t want a glass top table, are there any other options?
A. We stock quite a few non-glass table alternatives including aluminum slat top, porcelain tile, cast aluminum and more.

Q. Can I leave my umbrella up all the time?
A. An unattended umbrella on casual furniture is an invitation to disaster. Our weather changes quickly and a raised umbrella can tip over, breaking both the umbrella and the table. Always lower your umbrella when not in use.

Q. Do you carry other casual furniture besides standard patio tables and chairs?
A. Yes! We carry bistro and bar height sets as well as conversation and gas firepit sets. We also have a wide selection of side tables, ottomans, recliner and lounge chairs.

Q. How often should I seal my speciality tabletop?
A. Check with your salesperson on the specific requirements for your tabletop. Some tabletops require specific products to be used in sealing while other materials require no special care.

Casual + Patio Furniture

Frequently asked questions

Q. Will you deliver patio furniture to my home?
A. Yes, we do offer fast, convenient service.

Q. Do your tables have regular or tempered glass?
A. All of the glass tables we sell are tempered glass.

Q. What is the difference between wicker and all-weather wicker?
A. Wicker is a natural wood product that, when exposed to moisture, can break down over time. All-weather wicker is a synthetic, water resistant product.

Q. Can I special order my furniture in a different color?
A. Yes! We do offer the option to special order, so you can customize your furniture to fit your needs. We have fabric and frame samples available at our store for your convenience.

Q. What types of accessories do you offer?
A. We carry umbrellas and bases in a variety of colors and styles as well as a full line of furniture covers. We also have a selection of outdoor lights, fireburners, fountains and more.

Q. I don’t want a glass top table, are there any other options?
A. We stock quite a few non-glass table alternatives including aluminum slat top, porcelain tile, cast aluminum and more.

Q. Can I leave my umbrella up all the time?
A. An unattended umbrella on casual furniture is an invitation to disaster. Our weather changes quickly and a raised umbrella can tip over, breaking both the umbrella and the table. Always lower your umbrella when not in use.

Q. Do you carry other casual furniture besides standard patio tables and chairs?
A. Yes! We carry bistro and bar height sets as well as conversation and gas firepit sets. We also have a wide selection of side tables, ottomans, recliner and lounge chairs.

Q. How often should I seal my speciality tabletop?
A. Check with your salesperson on the specific requirements for your tabletop. Some tabletops require specific products to be used in sealing while other materials require no special care.